Saturday, August 09, 2008

Meddling with the medals

So the Olympics are here.
Sigh ...

How did I find myself in this sports-mad family when I even lost the losers' race in my primary school?

And when I talk about the politics ...
... 3 pairs of ears simultaneously close ...
... 3 pairs of hands simultaneously cover said ears ...
... and 3 mouths simultaneously yell, 'Killjoy!'
... swiftly followed by 'What's for supper? It's hard work lying on this settee watching other people sweat.'

I know I'm not the only one to care about the issues.
And here's the proof ...
Dear friends,

As the Beijing Olympics begin, the world looks on
with mixed emotions. It's a moment which should bring
us closer together, and Chinese citizens deserve their excitement --
but the Chinese government still hasn't opened
meaningful dialogue with the Dalai Lama,

or changed its stance on Burma, Darfur and other pressing issues.

The Dalai Lama's Olympic handshake is circling the world,
headed for Beijing.
Click below to see more and join the call for dialogue!

CLICK HERE TO SHAKE HANDS



Even worse, extremists in China are promoting the view that
Olympic activism like ours is anti-Chinese.
We can't stay silent, but we also can't let our efforts be abused
to divide people.
So what can we do?
The answer comes from the Dalai Lama himself, in
an unambiguous gesture of Olympic spirit
and friendship: a handshake.


It began in London, passed hand to hand by thousands of us
-- now the handshake has gone online, and is criss-crossing
the globe on its way to Beijing.
All of us can join, Chinese and non-Chinese,
and it comes with a promise:
to hold ALL our governments accountable where they fall short,
in Tibet, Iraq, Burma or beyond.
We'll deliver our message in a bold media campaign
in Hong Kong and around the world:
Click below to see how the Olympic handshake started,
sign up to join in, and watch it circle the globe --


http://www.avaaz.org/en/handshake

The worldwide outcry has produced a little progress,
but much resistance from Chinese officials so far.
If we are to see advances not setbacks after the Games,
we need to show both that our voices will never fall silent,
and that our challenge is a positive one.

We have one last chance to reclaim the spirit of the Olympics,
with the message of friendship and dialogue we share with
the Dalai Lama.
The more people join the global handshake,
the more powerful our message will be when it hits
the Chinese and international media.

"One World, One Dream" is an ideal that's bigger than the Olympics
-- it's time for citizens around the world to take it back.

2 comments:

Sharon J said...

I couldn't agree more.

I refuse to watch as much as a second of the Olympics - nothing will ever change if people don't demand that change through their actions and not just words.

Am off to take part in the hand-shake now.

Minx said...

Shaking hands and passing it on...

Better tell them there is an Olympics ban in this house - heh, heh.